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[e-drug] What Motivates Drug Donations? (cont'd)


  • From: "Scott D. Hillstrom" <scott.hillstrom@analyticorp.co.nz>
  • Date: Mon, 28 Feb 2000 16:35:16 -0500 (EST)

<lpbbihbpmjnimfndednooeefcfaa.scott.hillstrom@analyticorp.co.nz>
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E-drug: What Motivates Drug Donations? (cont'd)
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Joel,

Your point that there are reasons that people don't complain about
bad care is a good one. Here are some of the things that I have heard
in my travels.

1. Charities sometimes accept bad donations because donors want
them to and, if the charity declines, they fear that they will not get
future good donations. This has been intimated to me by senior
officials in the charity sector.

2. The above is even more true in the developing world where good
drugs are still more precious. Health providers in Africa, for example,
are often afraid to complain about anything because they must
compete vigorously to obtain what little help they get. They fear that
complaining will spell the end of any more support.

3. Much of the health care delivery system in the developing world is
in chaos. Even the most basic western standards of care are often not
followed. An impotent drug or an adverse drug reaction is of little note
in a Malaria epidemic or natural disaster situation. And there is usually
no reporting system in place to collect such information.

4. If a child dies because its mother gave it an out-dated diet pill sold
to her on the black market as an anti-biotic, instead of the medicine it
needed, there is no one to tell. Nothing to do. The information is not
collected and reported.

5. Useless drugs that should have been disposed of in the U.S. are
sometimes dumped in the developing world where people who live
around the dumps find and repackage them for sale. There is no way
to record and quantify such activity in the developing world.

The bottom line is that donors and charities are responsible for their
actions and must take appropriate measures to protect against
foreseeable problems that arise from their activities.

Scott Hillstrom
President, Cry for the World Foundation
e-mail: scott.hillstrom@analyticorp.co.nz

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