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[e-drug] Therapeutics Letter 33 now on the web


  • From: Ciprian Jauca <jauca@ti.ubc.ca>
  • Date: Thu, 10 Feb 2000 03:49:25 -0500 (EST)

E-drug: Therapeutics Letter 33 now on the web
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I would like to bring to your attention the December 1999 / January /
February 2000 issue (#33) of the Therapeutics Letter on Treatment of
Pain in the Older Patient that was just made available a few minutes
ago on the Therapeutics Initiative web-site at
http://www.ti.ubc.ca/pages/letter33.htm

I invite you to drop by and have a look at this Letter. Please feel free
to forward this message to any of your friends or colleagues that
might be interested in this topic.

This Letter reviews various aspects regarding diagnosis and treatment
of pain in the older patient, including a review of the evidence on all
classes of drugs commonly used for this.

Conclusions:
* Chronic pain, particularly of musculo-skeletal origin, is a common
problem for the elderly.
* Long-term controlled trials in older people with chronic pain are
lacking and are needed to guide rational therapy.
* Physiological changes that occur with aging make older individuals
more sensitive to the effects of drugs.
* Most analgesic drugs provide modest benefit to only a minority of
patients.
* Start with low doses and titrate; symptomatic and functional
benefits are evident early (usually within 1-2 weeks).
* Benefit of each analgesic must be established by a therapeutic trial
and reassessed regularly.
* Overall goal of analgesic therapy is improved function and quality of
life.

We would appreciate receiving your comments on this Therapeutics
Letter and its possible implications in clinical practice.

Regards,
Ciprian D Jauca
Program Coordinator
Therapeutics Initiative - Evidence Based Drug Therapy
University of British Columbia

2176 Health Sciences Mall
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3
Canada

E-mail: jauca@ti.ubc.ca
Phone: +1 (604) 822-0700
GSM Mobile Phone: +1 (604) 722-2075
Fax: +1 (604) 822-0701
Web: http://www.ti.ubc.ca

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